Searching LUCI


LUCI was conceived as a searchable data bank of University of California digital images in a universal format shared on the Internet. The intention is to allow the world access to some of our holdings, although there are plans for future expansion. There is only a small percentage of the 3,000,000 slides and 200,000 digital images presently archived in UC Visual Resources Collections, but it's a start!

ACCESS and EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES

These digital images and the associated textual description are accessible to the public in thumbnail format with the high-resolution images being reserved for UC campuses. The intention is to allow the world access to our holdings and data, but to ensure that the high quality images are only available for the educational purposes of the University of California. A variety of applications for the use of these images have been developed, including but not limited to image study and research, instructional tutorials, classroom projection, and online catalogs.

LUCI CONTENT

The first phase of LUCI in 1997 brought together 1,200 digital images of classical art and architecture from three campuses. In 2000 the collaborators expanded to include seven campuses. A content leap was made from antiquity to California art and architecture (due to thematic grant funding) with both visual and performing arts images now being included. Amongst this eclectic mix you can currently find images of: ancient Greek and Roman archaeology, architecture, and art; California architecture, gardens, murals, and public art; and UC architecture, public art, and the work of artists teaching on the various campuses. The content decisions were made by consensus amongst the partners and based upon the availability of material, copyright considerations, and faculty support. For more information about the future of the LUCI project see the publications link.

SEARCHING THE DATABASE

At the query page you will automatically be able to search the entire image database (all seven UC campuses), unless you choose to search one campus in particular. For an example of a simple search, just try typing a place name, such as Rome. We recommend that you don't use more than one or two fields simultaneously for simple searches.

The various searchable fields are as follows with illustrative examples in parentheses: title (Building of Eumachia), place (Pompeii), subject (statues), personal/group name (Eumachia), source (M. Burns), and date range (before 79 CE). If you are unsure of the complete word or phrase for a given field, you can use truncation. For example, to turn up an interesting mural try: title=censorship%, place=Venice%, subject=public art. Please note that the keyboard percentage symbol (%) is what should be used to truncate. If a search turns up no results, a good rule of thumb is to try limiting your search to one field, such as the subject public art. Successful searches often require only one very specific term and it is often uneccesary to enter additional terms, but you can build and refine if you want to.

There is also the option of using the detailed look-up tables to determine the exact terminology or learn the searching conventions in the database. Look-up tables are available in the following field types: title, place, subject, and personal/group name .. Click on the underlined field name of choice to get to the associated list in a separate browser window. Once in a given list, you can use the alphabetical selection at the top of the page to speed navigation. Double-clicking on a term automatically inserts the term into the associated field in the query form. Also, at the top of the screen are quick links to the other available lists if you want to move from title to subject, for example. You can search using terms from more than one look-up table. You can only have one list open at a time and you may have to close the list's pop-up window or use the tool bar at the bottom to get back to the query page.

After a search has been successful, you will see a maximum of twelve images on your browser screen, which include tombstone textual information. A box at the bottom helps you navigate to the additional pages of images discovered in your search. To return to query form use the underlined link provided directly below the images. When you click on an image, the next screen will show the same thumbnail with a more detailed cataloguing record. The local number field provides you with a unique image identification number should you ever want to track down the analog slide equivalent and you can also determine which campus it is from by looking at what is in the image owner field. Click on the thumbnail once again to obtain the high resolution image (only available on UC campuses). The digital images and the associated textual description are accessible to the public in thumbnail format. The high resolution images are only available for the educational purposes of the University of California and are therefore restricted to campus use. UC users may copy and paste these images into a variety of applications, including but not limited to image study and research, instructional tutorials, classroom projection, and online catalogs.

SUGGESTIONS/QUESTIONS

Please send any suggestions or questions directly to the webmaster, Jackie Spafford.

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